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Dill Pickles

Dill Pickles

It has been many years since I  made nice garlicy dill pickles. I am usually drawn to making Yum Yums as they are a taste of my childhood and instantly take me back to my baba’s dining room table and the many family gatherings we would have. But this year I am craving dill pickles, vinegary and heavy on the garlic! After a very wet hot summer this years cucumber bumper crop did not disappoint. With a huge amount of cucumbers I have more then enough to do at least a double batch of dills.

I don’t like any funky spices in my dill pickles and keep it very simple with fresh dill and garlic. To give it a bit of extra zip I use a 7% vinegar.

Making dill pickles in the Nutmeg Disrupted kitchen.

 

 

As always be sure to sterilize all your jars and have them hot and ready to fill. Warm all lids and screw bands in a small saucepan keeping warm until needed. All pickles are processed in a hot water bath, be sure to check on times for your specific elevation. And to keep things clean and efficient I always use my canning funnel to aid in the addition of any liquids which I am using during canning.

 

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Dill Pickles
 
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Ingredients
  • small pickling cucumbers
  • 6 cups of water
  • 2 cups of 7% vinegar
  • ¼ cup of pickling salt
  • garlic cloves - peeled
  • dill heads
  • 7-8 1L jars
Instructions
  1. Scrub the cucumbers with a brush making sure all dirt is removed.
  2. Trim a bit off of each end of the cucumbers.
  3. Rinse well.
  4. Peel cloves of garlic, I used 4 cloves per jar.
  5. Shake the dill heads well to remove any bugs, give a quick rinse under water and place on paper towels to dry.
  6. In a large pot combine the vinegar, water and salt.
  7. Bring to a boil and boil for 3 -5 minutes.
  8. Place a head of dill and 2 cloves of garlic into the jars then fill with cucumbers packing tight.
  9. Add two final cloves of garlic.
  10. Using a canning funnel fill each jar with hot pickling brine.
  11. Add the lids and screw bands until finger tight.
  12. Place all jars into the canner and process for 15 minutes

Making garlic dill pickles in the Nutmeg Disrupted kitchen

Allow the jars to cool for 24 hours on the counter before moving. Make sure all jars have sealed by pushing down on the center of the lids. If there is any type of flex the jar is not sealed and should be stored in the fridge and consumed first. A properly sealed lid has no give and will be slightly concaved. Store pickles in a dark cool location. The are ready to be enjoyed about 2 weeks after canning and will last up to one year in storage.

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Grilled Caesar Salad

Grilled Caesar Salad

Grilled Caesar Salad

It all started when I spotted a photo of a Grilled Caesar salad on Instagram from the Canola Eat Well team. I had heard of grilling romaine before but had never tried it. I love Caesar salad and I BBQ as often as I use the stove so it was high time I grilled some lettuce.

Grilling the romaine makes it very tender and gives the salad an amazing texture. The dressing is so fresh with the perfect hit of garlic and fantastic tanginess from the balsamic vinegar and grainy mustard. The buttery fruitiness of the reggiano is the perfect finish to compliment the dressing.

The recipe looks long with a lot of ingredients but it is actually quick and easy once the mise en place is done. Arranging the ingredients takes more time then preparing the actual salad. You will find that after you make the salad once you will be able to get it together and plated within 15 minutes.

A quick note: make extra croutons. They are so good you may find yourself and anyone else hanging around the kitchen snacking on them while dinner is getting prepped!

Grilled Caesar Salad

Romaine Hearts

2 lemons – zested

2 tablespoons of canola oil

croutons:

cheese bread sticks – cubed

2 tablespoon of canola oil

1 teaspoon of lemon zest

1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder

pinch of dried parsley

pinch of dried basil

salt and pepper

dressing:

2 cloves of garlic – grated

1 tablespoon of balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon of grainy mustard

2 tablespoons of grated parmigiana reggiano

1 teaspoon of Worcestershire

1 teaspoon of lemon zest

1/4 cup of canola oil

 

For the croutons: Heat 2 tablespoons of canola oil in a pan over medium. Add the cubed bread sticks, tossing to coat. Cook until nice and toasty, 5 – 6 minutes. Add the garlic powder, a pinch of salt and pepper, 2 tablespoons of grated parmigiana reggiano and 1 teaspoon of lemon zest and the dried herbs,  stirring well.  Pour into a large bowl and let cool.

making croutons for grilled caesar salad on Nutmeg Disrupted

For the dressing: In a small bowl combine the grated garlic, balsamic vinegar, grainy mustard, 2 tablespoons of grated reggiano, Worcestershire  and 1 teaspoon of lemon zest. Whisk in 1/4 cup of canola oil. Set aside.

Drizzle the romaine hearts and halved lemons with 2 tablespoons of canola oil.

Grill the romaine hearts and lemons over medium high heat flipping as needed. The romaine is done when it has a nice char on the edges.

grilling romaine hears for grilled caesar salad on Nutmeg Disrupted

To serve place a romaine heart on a plate, slice in half length wise. Top with croutons, dressing, freshly grated parmigiana reggina and finish with squeezing the juice of half a grilled lemon over everything.

grilled caesar salad from Nutmeg Disrupted

 

 

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Chive Blossom Vinegar

Chive Blossom Vinegar

Chive Blossom Vinegar

When I moved up north the yard I ended up with was in dire need of much love and tlc. It truly required a complete redo from the trees and shrubs right down to the lawn. Everything had to go. The only original section of the yard is a tiny 1×3 foot section in the back which is now my herb and bulb starting garden. And that is strictly because of the chives that grow there.

Growing chives in the Nutmeg Disrupted garden.

I love to use them in everything and it is always the first taste of spring to come from my yard.

Somewhere last summer I seen a picture of a bottle of deep magenta colored vinegar made from chive blossoms. Seriously, a genius idea. And I immediately headed out back to pluck a handful of pungent purple flowers.

Fresh chives with blossoms on Nutmeg Disrupted

I gave them a quick rinse then allowed them to air dry.

 

Chive blossoms for vinegar on Nutmeg Disrupted

I filled a jar full of blossoms and covered them with regular white pickling vinegar. Store someplace dark for 2 weeks.

Steeping chive blossom vinegar on Nutmeg Disrupted

Strain and bottle.

It is fantastic! The blossoms give the vinegar an almost sweet onion aroma and the flavor is rich, tangy pure onion goodness.

vinegar

 

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