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Category: preserving

Dill Pickles

Dill Pickles

It has been many years since I  made nice garlicy dill pickles. I am usually drawn to making Yum Yums as they are a taste of my childhood and instantly take me back to my baba’s dining room table and the many family gatherings we would have. But this year I am craving dill pickles, vinegary and heavy on the garlic! After a very wet hot summer this years cucumber bumper crop did not disappoint. With a huge amount of cucumbers I have more then enough to do at least a double batch of dills.

I don’t like any funky spices in my dill pickles and keep it very simple with fresh dill and garlic. To give it a bit of extra zip I use a 7% vinegar.

Making dill pickles in the Nutmeg Disrupted kitchen.

 

 

As always be sure to sterilize all your jars and have them hot and ready to fill. Warm all lids and screw bands in a small saucepan keeping warm until needed. All pickles are processed in a hot water bath, be sure to check on times for your specific elevation. And to keep things clean and efficient I always use my canning funnel to aid in the addition of any liquids which I am using during canning.

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Dill Pickles
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • small pickling cucumbers
  • 6 cups of water
  • 2 cups of 7% vinegar
  • ¼ cup of pickling salt
  • garlic cloves - peeled
  • dill heads
  • 7-8 1L jars
Instructions
  1. Scrub the cucumbers with a brush making sure all dirt is removed.
  2. Trim a bit off of each end of the cucumbers.
  3. Rinse well.
  4. Peel cloves of garlic, I used 4 cloves per jar.
  5. Shake the dill heads well to remove any bugs, give a quick rinse under water and place on paper towels to dry.
  6. In a large pot combine the vinegar, water and salt.
  7. Bring to a boil and boil for 3 -5 minutes.
  8. Place a head of dill and 2 cloves of garlic into the jars then fill with cucumbers packing tight.
  9. Add two final cloves of garlic.
  10. Using a canning funnel fill each jar with hot pickling brine.
  11. Add the lids and screw bands until finger tight.
  12. Place all jars into the canner and process for 15 minutes

Making garlic dill pickles in the Nutmeg Disrupted kitchen

Allow the jars to cool for 24 hours on the counter before moving. Make sure all jars have sealed by pushing down on the center of the lids. If there is any type of flex the jar is not sealed and should be stored in the fridge and consumed first. A properly sealed lid has no give and will be slightly concaved. Store pickles in a dark cool location. The are ready to be enjoyed about 2 weeks after canning and will last up to one year in storage.

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Sun Gold Kiwi Jam

Sun Gold Kiwi Jam

My favourite fruit is anything tropical. There is something to be said about the rich sweetness that you find in a kiwi, mango,  pineapple or passion fruit.

I was very excited to create something spectacular when a call out from the team over at Zespri Kiwifruit asked bloggers from across Canada to create new recipes using Sun Gold Kiwifruit. Head down to your nearest produce section and check out the kiwifruit in store. Sun Gold kiwifruit looks like green kiwifruit from a distance but they are different. Sun Gold kiwifruit is sweeter then green kiwifruit. It has a beautiful yellow flesh colour and it tastes like a cross between a mango and strawberry. But its most obvious difference is the Sun Gold kiwifruit has a somewhat smooth hairless skin. Sun Gold Kiwifruit contains Vitamin C (more then 3 times the amount found in oranges), Vitamin E, potassium (as much as a medium banana), fibre and folic acid and is available from May thru to October.

Sun Gold Kiwifruit on Nutmeg Disrupted

Much of the produce available right now is at the height of freshness, not only to enjoy today but to can and preserve to enjoy months down the road. If you have never canned before I suggest starting with jam. The batches are small, the prep is quick and easy and it is a fantastic way to get your feet wet. Because what could be better then enjoying some luscious tropical kiwi jam in the middle of a January deep freeze.

It is important to use sterilized, hot  jars and lids. Everything you need comes in a case of canning jars.  The lids and screw bands go into a small pot of water which you bring to a simmer to keep warm. Wash and dry your jars and place on a large baking rack and set in the oven at 225 degrees F for 10 minutes. Keep them warm until ready to fill. Or you can fill a canner with water and place your jars in the water and heat to 180 degrees F. A metal canning rack makes easy work of adding all the jars at once.

I add a 1/2 teaspoon of butter to all my jams and jellies to prevent bubbly scum from forming from the boiling process. I rarely have to skim my jellies any more. I add this after the first boil. You will need to process the full jars of jelly in the water bath canner. Have it filled with 3-4 inches of warm water and place it on a burner to heat while you are making the jam.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Sun Gold Kiwi Jam
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: preserving
Cuisine: condiment
Serves: 5pints
Ingredients
  • 7-8 medium SunGold kiwifruit
  • ⅔ cups of unsweetened pineapple juice
  • ⅓ cup of lime juice
  • 1 package of certo pectin
  • 3 cups of sugar
  • ½ cup of flaked coconut
  • ¼ cup of Apricot Brandy
  • ½ teaspoon of butter
  • a few drops of yellow food colouring (optional)
  • 5 half pint jars
Instructions
  1. Cut and scoop the kiwi out of their skins.
  2. It is so much easier then peeling and is the way we eat it fresh, right out if the skins.
  3. Place the fruit in a medium sized bowl and mash.
  4. Measure out 2 cups of fruit.
  5. Combine the kiwifruit, pineapple juice and lime juice in a large deep saucepan.
  6. Add the fruit pectin, stirring until dissolved. Bring the mixture to a full boil, stirring constantly.
  7. Add the sugar, flaked coconut and butter, return to a full rolling boil.
  8. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly.
  9. Remove from heat and skim any foam that is on the surface using a metal spoon.
  10. Stir in the brandy.
  11. Stir in the food colouring.
  12. Ladle jam into sterilized jars leaving a quarter inch of headspace.
  13. Apply lids and screw bands, just until finger tight.
  14. Place into the canner and process for 10 minutes.

This jam turned out fabulously! It has an amazing flavour that is kicked up a notch from the touch of lime. Not only does it add a bit of zing it also brings out the flavour of the pineapple. I left the kiwifruit a bit chunky when I mashed it which along with the coconut gives the jam a great texture.  And the colour, spectacular!

Of course it is fantastic slathered on hot buttered toast or bagels it would be wonderful cooked down a bit and used to baste pork or even better, as a glaze on crisp salty chicken wings!

Head down to your local grocer and grab some Sun Gold Kiwifruit then head over to Twitter and Instagram and look up #Zespri4life to see what other amazing dishes you can create with these sweet golden gems!

Sun Gold Zespri Kiwifruit on Nutmeg Disrupted

Disclosure: This post is sponsored by Zespri Kiwifruit. I was compensated for my time and was supplied with some fantastic Sun Gold Kiwifruit.

Sun Gold Kiwi Jam on Nutmeg Disrupted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Making Bacon

Making Bacon

You have to wonder who thought it was a good idea to take a chunk of pork belly, rub it with sugar, salt and spices and after allowing it to rest for a few days decided it needed a nice layer of smoke with a few hours spent in the smoker.

Making bacon at home with Nutmeg Disrupted

Pretty damn delicious decision.

It has been an interesting process of learning and research since deciding to make bacon at home. It was spurred by a recent visit with some of our oldest friends out at their farm. They have been raising pigs for a while now and after spending time out at their place it brought back many memories of when we had pigs of our own. We raised 2 kinds of pigs. Over the years we had both domestic pigs and we also had a large herd of wild boar. We would have pig roasts of wild boar that would turn into weekend long events!  And it was those events from which my passion for BBQ began.

After much discussion it was decided that we would buy a pig to butcher once they grow to a good sized weight.

And with pork on our mind our thoughts naturally turned to bacon.

Many things have graced the racks of the smoker but we have yet to make bacon. So with that in mind the research began. Any new smoking adventure always requires some research. in some cases you are working with expensive cuts of meat and while trail and error is a good way to learn it is always a good idea to do some research to find a starting point.

The first thing you need to find to make bacon is curing salt. The second thing you will need is time because as we quickly learnt it takes time to make bacon. It is easy to make, but after a few batches in there are step that definitely affect the final product. Taking your time is imperative to a superior end result. Do not rush, rushing will only leave you disappointed. The goal here is bacon, not seasoned side pork.

Curing salt should not be hard to find. It is available in stores that carry wood chips, smokers and BBQ products. We could not find just curing salt but we did find a bacon cure kit which has a mixture of curing salt and maple sugar. If you can not find that specific kit there are jerky making sets available that contain the curing salt required to make bacon. You can also search for online sources if you have trouble finding it locally.

Curing bacon on Nutmeg Disrupted

The pork belly is available in the meat section where I shop. If it is not on the shelf just ask your butcher. Be sure to get it with the rind on.

Pork belly being prepped for curing and smoking to make bacon from Nutmeg Disurupted

The list of ingredients is short. You will also need some large Ziplock bags.

pork belly

cure – 2 tablespoons per pound

brown sugar – 2 tablespoons per pound

Place the pork belly on a cookie sheet with an edge. (this is purely for easy clean up) Rub the pork belly on all sides with the cure. Sprinkle with a few tablespoons of brown sugar and rub all over the pork. Place each piece of pork belly into individual ziplock bags, removing as much air as possible and seal. Place in the fridge.

Now the next part depends on the thickness of the pork belly. In doing the research for this we discovered variations of how many days you want to brine the pork bellies for. The idea is the thicker the cut the longer the brine time.

For the first batch the pork was an inch thick. We brined it for 2 days, flipping the pork over every 12 hours. We did a short brine as the pork was quite thin and we were concerned that the bacon may end up being too salty. The second batch was much thicker at close to 2 inches. We brined those for two days, flipping the pork every 12 hours. At the end of the entire smoking process we found that the second batch did NOT brine long enough. It definitely should have been left for another 2 days. It was good but there was definitely room for improvement. This is the part you do not want to rush. It takes the meat from being side pork to bacon.

A good rule of thumb is to brine it for 2 days per inch of thickness.

*notes: Some sites say to keep the pork in the brine for up to a week to 10 days. My main concern is having too salty of a product leaving it that long. My suggestion is too experiment and see what works for you.

Once the pork has been brined for the adequate period you can move to the next step.

Remove the cured pork bellies from the bags and rinse well under cold water. Now we want to soak the pork for at least an hour to 2 hours at the longest. A large container or Ziplock bag will work fine. Fill with cold water and pop in the belly. After the soak dry the pork with paper towels to remove all the moisture. Place the pork, rind side down in a container and cover lightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the pork for 24 hours. This step is very important. During this stage the pork is forming pellicle, the proteins are forming a skin over the meat for which the smoke will adhere to. Do not skip this stage, it is what gives the pork belly the smoky bacon flavour.

 

Getting the smoker ready!

 

Applewood is the preferred wood of choice in most of our smoking. If apple is not available cherry is the second choice. Use the kind that you like! We like the smaller wood chips and we do not wet the chips. We like a fast heavy smoke and from our experience wet chips take longer to get smoking at the level we want.  The liquid used in the smoker this time around was water. The smoker is always preheated and the meat does not go into the smoker until there is smoke. We want the meat cooked with the heat of the smoke not the heat of the smoker.

While you are waiting for smoke, get the pork belly ready for the smoker.

Have the racks in the kitchen so you can quickly get the meat into the smoker with minimal smoke loss. You want the portions of belly to have space between them so they get smoke on the entire surface of each piece. Place the pork with the rind side on top.

Making bacon at home. Smoking pork belly from Nutmeg Disrupted

Place the rack(s) into the smoker and turn down to maintain a temperature of 185 – 200 degrees. We replaced the wood chips once at the one hour mark and smoked the pork for a total of 2 hours. When it was done the racks were pulled out of the smoker and placed on paper towels to cool completely. Once cool the bacon was vacuum packed and placed in the fridge overnight to firm up and absorb the smoke. The longer you can hold off trying it the better the smoke flavour will be.

Frying applewood smoked bacon made at home from Nutmeg Disrupted

Remove the rind and slice to fry. Be sure to take note of the two bacon ends and save them for yourself. They are the smokiest most flavourful part of the bacon. If you sample a slice or two then go back to the saved bacon end you will taste the difference.

 

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